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How to burn 500 calories everyday

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Sobiya N. Moghul,Health Me Up 

We are programmed to believe that losing weight is a Herculean task, which involves grueling exercise schedules, crash diets and drastic lifestyle changes. 

But the truth is far from it. Yes, you need exercise to feel and be your best and healthy eating should be a part of your daily life, but weight loss isn’t just about a one hour fitness routine or some simple diet tips. It’s about how you live each day, what you do, and how you do it. So if you’re fresh out of ideas and want some extra help to burn 500 more calories every day, you’ve come to the right place! Here’s a list of 15 activities that will help you knock off those extra calories stacking up on the weighing scale.

2 hours of bowling burns 500 calories. According to fitnessforweightloss.com one can burn 105-285 calories in 30 minutes of bowling, depending on your weight.

– If you are 72 kgs than you burn 219 calories in one hour
– If you are 91 kgs than you burn 273 calories in one hour
– If you are 109 kgs than you burn 327 calories in one hour

Talking to your loved ones on the phone in the office basement? No, don’t stop, just start walking up and down the stairs while you continue your act of care. This wil not only burn calories but tone your glutes, as well!

Body weight influences caloric usage during 5 minutes of stair climbing. 30 min at a pace of 8 min per mile burns 500 calories. How many calories you burn depends on your body weight. The more you weigh the harder your body has to work and so the more calories you burn.

Clean, mop and dust your house for 2 hours and burn 500 calories for sure!

It depends on your current weight, how long you work, how hard you work and what activities you do. The type of activity you’re doing makes a difference.If a person weighing 45kgs spends 15 minutes mopping, he/she will burn 77 calories. Washing dishes for 15 minutes would burn 38 calories. Scrubbing the floors would burn 65 calories.

And if this doesn’t sound interesting, you can just turn on your favorite playlist and dance with your broom too! That can boost the number of calories burnt by another 15%!

Don’t just stop there. If you’re on the phone, walk around while you talk. You’ll burn more calories standing than sitting. Stand while talking on the phone. Better yet, try a standing desk — or improvise with a high table or counter. Eat lunch standing up.

If you can’t get away from your desk, try standing to make a phone call or read a report. Even shutting your office door to squeeze in 5 minutes of pushups or jumping jacks can burn another 50 calories.

Six hours of kissing burns 500 calories!

Foreplay burns fewer calories. A person weighing 70 kgs would burn 25 calories in 15 minutes of foreplay. Stretch foreplay out to burn more calories. The same person would burn 216 calories in 45 minutes of foreplay.

Oral sex: 100 calories

Woman on top, 10 minutes: 300 calories for women, 130 calories for men.

Sex standing up: Up to 600 calories for both people.

What’s the use of just watching Kareena shaking her booty on popular Bollywood tracks? Go join a Zumba class yourself and burn 500 calories! Provided you give your full effort throughout the class!

Dancing gives your body a complete workout. Rumba is good for stretching; it increases your flexibility and builds muscle strength. Most dance forms concentrate on your core muscles, especially the back. A fast dance form like jive works on your legs, as well as your arms. A person weighing 70 kgs would need to do fast ballroom dancing for approximately one hour and 25 minutes to burn 500 calories, according to Nutristrategy.

Two hours and ten minutes of standing and playing a guitar burns 500 calories. And who knows you may turn out to be the next rockstar! A healthy Rockstar!!

Skip rope! You’ll have burned a whopping 502 calories after skipping for just 51 minutes; you can break it up into two-minute segments during commercial breaks of your favorite shows.

Punish a punching bag for 70 minutes to burn 500 calories.

Think of someone who annoys you and swing away. Not only will this help burn those extra calories, it will also de-stress you quite effectively!

Brisk walking at a pace of 4 MPH for 90 minutes will burn 500 calories. When at work take just 20 minutes during lunch to briskly walk around outside while running errands or catching up on your phone calls; you’ll not only burn 81 calories with each 10 minute task, but you’ll also benefit from the fresh air.

Running at 6 MPH for 42 minutes will burn 500 calories. Wake up an hour earlier than you normally would, wear your running shoes and get started.

As quoted by Livestrong.com, the Ladies Home Journal website reveals that a woman weighing 58 kgs burns 531 calories running for one hour at a pace of 11 minutes per mile. Blast extra calories by adding speed intervals or jogging over hills.

Go play with your kids. 90 minutes of moderate play time with your tiny tots does the trick, plus, they’ll love it and you will sweat out those 500 calories too!

Leisurely swimming works best on a summer day; 65 minutes of it burns 500 calories! Depends on how fast you are swimming, what stroke, and how much you weigh, it is a broad range from about 450 to 950 calories per hour.

So get the swimming costume out of the closet and take a plunge!

Cycle away those extra calories. You will find this pedal power great fun. Suitable for everyone, any age or level of fitness, cycling helps weight loss as it burns calories, improves health and gets you out and about.

Depending on your weight and exertion level, cycling will help you lose weight by burning off between 75-670 extra calories in each half-hour session. Someone who weighs 110 kgs burns 500 calories over the course of an hour of biking at a semi-leisurely pace.

How about aerobics? Get at least 150 minutes a week of moderate aerobic activity or 75 minutes a week of vigorous aerobic activity. However, to effectively lose or maintain weight, some people may need up to 300 minutes a week of moderate physical activity. You can also do a combination of moderate and vigorous activities. Each session of activity should be at least 10 minutes in duration. High-impact aerobics burns 511 calories every day!

Tips

Parenting: MIND YOUR MIND

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mind-your-mind-parenting

Q- I am college drop out and am struggling with strange experiences since childhood. My mother has schizophrenia and was always in her own world and my grandmother looked after me and her. I do not remember being hugged or cuddled by either of them and have seen my grandmother working consistently, complaining and worrying. Often, I was the target of her outburst. In school, I never had friends and would feel comfortable being with myself. I feel something is missing and do not know how to sort myself out. Once, in Grade 7 I was referred to a counsellor, but I felt odd and did not talk to her- ST

Dear ST, It takes a lot of courage to share your story and having the clarity that there is something amiss and you need help. I really appreciate your first step. A childhood bereft of emotional bonding and loving care, is indeed lonely and hard. However, your ability to connect your present distress to your experiences and being aware of it, highlights the possibility of better times to come. Emotional Neglect is a parent’s or caregiver’s failure to act.

It’s a failure to notice, attend to, or respond appropriately to a child’s feelings. In your case, your mother’s illness did not let her feel and express her natural maternal instincts and it appears that your grandmother was overwhelmed with responsibilities and stress of being the only support to two dependents. Emotional neglect is generally unrecognized by the child until symptoms begin to appear in adulthood, as happened with you. The ideal response for you would be to seek one on one psychotherapy. Although, it was difficult for you to share with your counsellor earlier in school, but with present realization of something amiss; it would become easier to share and get support.

However, till you take the appointment and begin with identifying your feelings and needs. Try to label the exact feeling and list your strengths. Plan and work out the connection of your strengths with your goals or needs. Take one small step at a time and spend time doing constructive activities that make you feel good, such as exercise, a sport, a hobby, or volunteering at a place that interests you. Remember, your feelings matter! All these activities would provide opportunities to meet new people with similar interests. Make sure to have regular short and sweet conversations with people, gradually it would get easier and longer.

The more you focus on constructive, healthy ways of self-care, you would soon begin to experience the feelings. Try sharing your grandmother’s work load and help her in domestic chores, sharing domestic expenses through your income (if none, take a part time job) and your mother’s care.

Q -I am a mother of a nine months old baby. My husband’s job keeps him out of town for days and sometimes the whole week. Since my son’s birth; I have been unable to sleep due to his disturbed sleep at night. He has started to sleep for most of the night for past 3 to 4 months but somehow my sleep is lost! I am unable to have a sound sleep since then. It takes me hours of tossing and turning before I fall asleep and often the fear of my son waking up to disturb my sleep weighs heavy on my mind. When I get up in the morning on my son’s cry or movement; it is a struggle. In fact, the entire day I feel tired; until again the night when I am unable to sleep. I am scared to take sleeping pills, as the doctor has prescribed. -AT

Dear AT, It appears that you are stressed out due to single-handedly raising your infant. The good part is that he is grown out of the stage of inconsistent or short sleep patterns and now has a regular time of sleep and waking up. Please try to match your baby’s sleep time with yours. The prescription could be discussed with the doctor by raising your concerns of side effects or other aspects. Along with that, you can try psychotherapy and discuss the reasons for stress, the fears you have regarding your son’s night time waking, etc. Meanwhile, try a few of the following tips; such as spending the last hour before bed doing a calming activity such as reading, listening to meditative music, avoiding electronics, doing some physical exercise during the day.

DISCLAIMER: The answers given in this column are not to be taken as a professional psychotherapy service. It is completely educational in nature. Please note that each individual’s situation is different and one must consult a therapist for psychotherapy service or advice.

Rima Sehgal PhD
Registered Psychotherapist
rima.sehgal@fulbrightmail.org

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Canadian News

Canadian Cancer Society urges British Columbians to know risks of flavoured tobacco, reduce smoking rates

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Canadian Cancer Society urges British Columbians to know risks of flavoured tobacco, reduce smoking rates

DURING National Non-Smoking Week 2015, the Canadian Cancer Society BC and Yukon is encouraging British Columbians to know the risks of flavoured tobacco in an effort to bring down BC’s smoking rate from 13 per cent to 9 per cent. While BC has Canada’s lowest tobacco use rates, youth are especially susceptible to experiment with flavoured tobacco products which can lead to nicotine addiction.

“Smoking is still the leading cause of cancer deaths in BC. In spite of increased public awareness about the harms of smoking, our youth are increasingly using flavoured tobacco products. This must change,” says Kathryn Seely, Public Issues Director, Canadian Cancer Society, BC and Yukon. “From grape to strawberry, mint and even chocolate, flavoured tobacco is designed to look and smell appealing but it is just as risky and addictive as regular tobacco products.”

Data released as part of the 2014 Youth Smoking Survey showed that almost half of all BC high school students who used tobacco products had used flavoured tobacco products. Fruit and candy flavoured tobacco reduce the harsh effects of cigarette smoke for youth who are experimenting with smoking, making it easier for them to become addicted to tobacco.

“It is astonishing that tobacco – a legal product – kills one out of every two people when used as intended,” says Seely. “We want to see the BC government take a firmer stance on tobacco control to reduce BC’s smoking rates to single digits.”

To help bring the provincial smoking rate down to 9 per cent, the society is calling for:

  • An increase in tobacco taxes from $47.80 up to $50 per carton (200 cigarettes);
  • Regulations that would make outdoor patios of bars and restaurants as well as beaches, parks and playgrounds smoke-free;
  • A ban on the sale of e-cigarettes to minors and a ban on e-cigarette use in places where smoking is banned; and for
  • The BC government to take action to ban flavoured tobacco products next year, if the federal government does not ban the products this year.

Coinciding with National Non Smoking Week 2015, the Canadian Cancer Society is encouraging teens to know the risks of flavoured tobacco through an edgy public awareness campaign entitled Now Available. The campaign, designed in partnership with Rethink, is meant to create a conversation around flavoured tobacco and show the shocking reality that – just like regular tobacco – flavoured tobacco products can cause cancer and other health risks.

To learn more and to view the campaign video titled Operating Room visit: cancer.ca/flavours

For more information, visit cancer.ca or call the toll-free bilingual Cancer Information Service at 1-888-939-3333 (TTY 1-866-786-3934).

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Tips

Get Your Kids Engaged In Organized Sports


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Get Your Kids Engaged In Organized Sports

In the past 30 years, obesity has more than doubled in young children and quadrupled in adolescents, potentially leading to a host of chronic diseases later in life, according to the Centers for Disease Control.

Conversely, the CDC reports that regular physical activity provides a long list of physical benefits for children, but that’s not all. Daily exercise also promotes mental and emotional well-being that includes self-esteem.

“By now, I don’t think anyone is surprised that regular exercise is good for children and inactivity is places them at risk for illnesses later in life, but when you take a moment to consider the data in-depth for children who exercise and play organized sports, the details of a child’s future come to life,” says Danyel Surrency Jones, president of Power To Give and co-founder of Powerhandz Inc., (powerhandz.com), a company specializing in athletic training products to improve performance in baseball, basketball and football.

Danyel and her business partner and husband, Darnell Jones, a former professional basketball player who also co-founded Powerhandz, want kids in their community and beyond to benefit from the values learned from youth sports. That’s why they created the Power To Give program, which promotes positive development.

“We believe in the power of sports to change a kid’s life for the better,” says Darnell, who lists five significant benefits of youth sports.

kids sports

  • Cultivates a positive attitude: Sports are demanding. Come game time, a young athlete wouldn’t last long with a negative mindset. “Practice is no cakewalk either,” Darnell says. “As adults, we understand the need to hype ourselves before hitting the gym. The rewarding feeling we get walking out from the gym is similar to what young people feel after a game or tough practice.”
  • Offers a sense of accomplishment, confidence and self-esteem: As the CDC noted, simply being physically active builds self-esteem. We are physical beings who are not meant to sit in front of a videogame for several consecutive hours. “Again, if you’re a physically active adult, you feel that sense of accomplishment in outdoing your last performance at the gym,” Danyel says. “Kids feel a similar way learning new skills and succeeding in a game, except more so.”
  • Builds better peer relationships: Kids want to fit in, but it’s not always easy. Organized sports hurdles the high wall of social awkwardness so many children feel. Team sports such as baseball, basketball and football demand participants to work together for a common goal, which is a valuable lesson some adults still haven’t learned while interacting at work.
  • More restraint in avoiding risky behavior: Ideally, parents can get their children engaged – in anything that’s productive, really. Bored or disengaged children have a way of getting into trouble. A student is less likely to misbehave in class or break the law if it means getting kicked off the team of a sport they love.
  • Greater family attachment and frequent interactions with parents: Famous athletes say it all the time, “Thanks Mom. Thanks for driving me to and from practice, and thanks for showing up at the games.” And that doesn’t even count helping a child with actual practice – playing catch, squaring off one-on-one, etc.
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